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cfp national championship game College Football Playoff

If a picture is truly worth a thousand words, you might need to multiply this one a few hundred times. Everyone has a story about the 2019 College Football Playoff National Championship Game, and now everyone who was there has photo proof of them watching the Clemson Tigers embarrass the Alabama Crimson Tide.

This is far from the first time this type of photo has existed, but it never gets old. The CFP has released a 360-degree interactive fan photo, where you can search high and low at Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara, California for your family, friends, or even favorite player during Monday night’s game.

Needless to say, it’s an awesome photo.

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What makes it even more incredible than the 360-degree panoramic image is what it can do. Not only can you zoom in to practically every single seat in the stadium, but you can also tag yourself if you went to the game.

That’s right, you can actually tag yourself, share the digital postcard on social media, and show the world you were there that time Dabo Swinney and Clemson beat Nick Saban and Alabama, 44-16, on January 7, 2019.

If you weren’t at the game, no problem. All you have to do is find the College Football Playoff National Championship Trophy hidden in the stadium to enter to win a framed panoramic print of the game. And if you need help, just turn the sound on and the cheering crowd will get louder as you get closer to finding it.

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What were you doing with 12 minutes, 5 seconds remaining in the first quarter of the national title game? Take a few minutes, use the zoom, and go have some fun finding out.

READ MORE: Sorry, Alabama: You’re the Next Victims of ‘The Drake Curse’

Author placeholder image About the author:
With over 10 years of sports writing experience, Brett has covered some of the top local, regional, and national sporting events in the Heartland for both print and digital platforms. He is a graduate of Kansas State University and resides in Austin, Texas.
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